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Tag Archives: Home Equity Conversion Mortgage

“RightSize” New Home with a Reverse Mortgage?

bigstock-Sold-Home-For-Sale-Sign-Home-1893969According to recent National Association of Realtors figures, last year over 26% of homes were sold to homebuyers over the age of 50. And as the peak bulge of the boomer generation approaches retirement, the number of older homebuyers is expected to rise dramatically until it makes up the largest homebuyer cohort in American history.

But not everyone heading into retirement is certain they want to move, and a question I am commonly asked is, “Should we refinance the home we’re in, or buy something with less upkeep?”

Obviously I don’t know – but I have accumulated quite a body of knowledge regarding what retiring boomers take into consideration. Following is a starting point for things to consider:

1.     Is your existing home safe for the long-term, including layout and accessibility to bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchen and laundry?
2.     Is the home the right configuration? How about size?
3.     Is the amount of yard and household maintenance appropriate?
4.     Is the location still right, meaning are you close to family and friends?
5.     Have traffic patterns gotten dangerous?
6.     Are you close to doctors, shopping, amenities, recreation, and your house of worship?
7.     Do you still know your neighbors?
8.     Will this still be the right house in 10 years? How about in 15?

If you answer a significant number of these “no,” moving might be a logical consideration. However, anyone who recently has applied for a home loan knows lending laws and regulations have become akin to major surgery. And for those looking to retire soon, or who have already retired, securing a loan can be very difficult.

However, FHA’s seniors’-only HECM for Purchase was specifically designed with the retired – or soon to be retired – buyer in mind. While there are qualifications that must be met, they are not as stringent as those governing “forward” lending.

A highly beneficial feature of HECM for Purchase is that you can buy your new home before you have sold your exit home. Not only does this get you into your new home in a timely fashion, but you now have time to market your exit home and wait for the next peak sales season to roll around before selling.

But perhaps best of all, rather than tying up a significant amount of your financial resources in the new house by doing an all-cash purchase, you bring to the table only a percentage of the purchase price, which allows you to keep liquid more of your savings, or more cash from the sale of your exit home.

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INFORMATION FOR ADULT CHILDREN OF AGING PARENTS

Following is some helpful information when you are considering an FHA HECM for your parents:

House-safe• More Americans fear running out of money in retirement than fear death. With increasing life expectancy, it is easy to understand this fear. Increasingly, long-term retirement planning includes a reverse mortgage as a means to increase cash flow and address income shortfalls in retirement. Nearly one quarter of homeowners say long-term financial planning was their reason for originating their HECM.

• Nearly half of homeowners considering a reverse mortgage are under age 70.

• About two-thirds of HECM borrowers want to extinguish monthly mortgage payments to make more money available for daily needs. Another way of saying this is that most homeowners have a traditional mortgage – which is paid in full when they close on their reverse mortgage.

• The percentage of workers aged 55 or older who are still employed is up to 40%. However, staying in the workforce can become increasingly difficult as people get older.  Proceeds from the HECM may provide provide tax-free funds and may allow older homeowners to retire

 

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As Housing Market Thaws, Seniors Once Again Willing to Move

bigstock-Sold-Home-For-Sale-Sign-Home-1893969A surge in consumer confidence, rising home prices and sales, and faster selling times for properties on the market are all positive signs for the senior housing industry. It’s enough to make some market analysts believe seniors have finally reached the seventh stage of recovering from housing market-related grief: acceptance and hope.

“About two years ago the market was in shock, going through the stages of grief, aligned with the housing market,” says Michael Starke, owner and managing director of senior market feasibility firm PMD Advisory Services, LLC. “They were in [the] denial, bargaining [stages]. But now the majority have moved into a period of acceptance. There is a lot more willingness on the part of the senior to start looking at moving. They’re more confident about the ability to sell their home.”

Part of that includes adjusted expectations as to what their homes are worth, he adds, and based on more than 100 focus groups PMD Advisory has conducted on about 1,500 seniors around the country, many now feel they can sell and get a fair deal—even if it’s less than what they might have gotten four to five years ago.

“It’s a trend I’m excited about,” Starke said. “Seniors seem to be in a place of acceptance about their economic situation and their home values. The activity level is starting to move, and that’s a really good sign.”

Existing home sales rose in April to the highest level since November 2009, according to the National Association of Realtors, up 9.7% from the previous year.

Properties are also selling more quickly, on the market for a median 46 days in April compared to 62 days just one month prior—the fewest days since the NAR started monitoring it in May 2011.

The slow but steady recovery of the housing market is good news for the senior living industry, and Chris McGraw, senior research analyst at the National Investment Center (NIC) for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry, noted that existing home sales are a better indicator for the independent living market than are home prices.

“At one point in time, the relationship [between housing prices and occupancy] was very strong during 2006 and 2009 when pretty much all economic data was plummeting,” said McGraw. ”Since 2009, the relationship hasn’t been quite as strong, because when you’re looking at occupancy, there are a whole lot of factors going into play.”

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Chart credit: NIC—NIC MAP & Case-Shiller Home Price Indices 

Since bottoming out at 86.8% in the third quarter of 2009, independent living reached 89.3% as of the end of the first quarter of 2013, according to NIC data. Meanwhile, home prices increased 12.1% in April 2013 compared to the previous year—the most in more than seven years, according to CoreLogic.

However, independent living census is still below pre-recession peaks of 92.5%, reached in the fourth quarter of 2005 and again in the first quarter of 2007, and while there appears to be a correlation between occupancy and home prices on the recovery side, there’s more to the picture.

“Housing does play a piece, but it’s not the sole driver,” McGraw says of independent living occupancy.

The supply of new units is one piece of the puzzle, according to him, along with the performance of the stock market and its impact on seniors’ retirement portfolios, employment rates, consumer confidence, and the economy in general.

New construction for senior living stalled almost completely in the wake of the recession, but with a robust U.S. stock market spurred by low interest rates, capital is less constrained, say developers.

Another positive: consumer confidence reached a six-year high in May of 84.5 on the Thomson-Reuters/University of Michigan consumer sentiment index.

“The surge in consumer confidence is exactly the type of economic jumpstart the Federal Reserve intended to result from its aggressive policies,” said Richard Curtin, chief economist at Surveys of Consumers at Thomson-Reuters/University of Michigan, in a statement.

But there are caveats, including unemployment rates hovering at 7.6% through May 2013 and a recent report from the St. Louis Federal Reserve finding that household wealth still lags behind pre-recession levels when factoring in inflation.

“It will take actual and repeated income increases,” Curtain said, “rather than simply a renewed optimistic outlook for consumers to permanently revise their income expectations upward.”

 

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“HECM Saver”: New option lowers Reverse Mortgage costs AGAIN!!

If you have been toying with the idea of taking out a reverse mortgage, note that the market today is significantly different from what it was just a couple of months ago.

Monthly insurance premiums on new loans went up last week, making an expensive product even more so. But the Department of Housing and Urban Development has offset that rise by introducing another reverse mortgage — the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage Saver — which slashes the upfront cost.

“It’s a mixed bag,” says David Certner, legislative policy director for AARP, of the reverse mortgage market.

A reverse mortgage is suited for older homeowners who have lots of equity built up in their home, but little cash and no other ways to increase their income. The amount you can borrow is tied to your age — you must be at least 62 — the value of your home and the interest rate. And you can get the money in a lump sum, monthly payment, line of credit or any combination of these.

Unlike a traditional mortgage, you don’t make monthly repayments with a reverse mortgage. Instead, the principal, interest and fees add up month to month. The loan is repaid when you sell the house, move out or die.

High fees have been a major drawback of reverse mortgages. With these loans, you have many of the same expenses you do with any mortgage, such as an appraisal. On top of that, the origination fee on a reverse mortgage can be up to $6,000.

You also must pay a monthly mortgage insurance premium for reverse mortgages that are federally insured, which is almost all them. This insurance protects lenders in case a house ends up being worth less than the amount borrowed and covers borrowers in case a lender fails.

That monthly insurance premium last week for new loans went from an annual rate of 0.5 percent on balance to 1.25 percent. This was raised to protect the government — and ultimately taxpayers — from having to make big payouts to lenders because of falling house prices, Certner says.

The new HECM Saver reverse mortgage offers some relief, though, by substantially cutting one of the upfront fees.

With the standard reverse mortgage, borrowers must pay an upfront insurance premium worth 2 percent of the value of the property, up to a certain limit. That’s $4,000 on a $200,000 house.

The Saver loan’s upfront premium is 0.01 percent, or $20 on that same home.

With current losses in senior equity retirement accounts (IRA’s, 401k’s) since 2007, this latest revision by HUD should be greatly received by many seniors and their financial advisers,  as a solution to supplementing depleted retirement funds at greatly reduced costs.

 
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Posted by on October 19, 2010 in Uncategorized

 

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Need Home Modifications To Age In Place? A Reverse Mortgage May Help

Most seniors want to stay in their homes and remain independent yet often believe they can’t for a number of reasons.  Making some home modifications could make their wish of remaining in their home a reality by providing a safer more comfortable environment.

More than one third of those age 65 and older suffer injuries from a fall each year according to research from the National Center for Injury Control and Prevention.  AARP research suggests the leading cause of injury and deaths among seniors is falls.  Modifying one’s home can help to eliminate common hazards and help to improve the quality of living in one’s home.  Improving the safety of one’s home can help one have more comfort, convenience, and  remain independent and active in their community.  Some people have mobility limitations from causes other than falls and still want to stay in their home.  This too can be accomplished with some home modifications.Home modifications can help seniors remain in home

Bathing, toileting, cooking, and climbing stairs can be made easier to perform by adapting one’s home.  Modifying one’s home can be as simple as installing grab bars in the bathrooms, removing throw rugs, moving electrical cords from hazardous locations, touch buttons for turning lights on and off to installing entrances to accommodate wheel chairs and lifts to access another level.

By assessing and modifying one’s home, one can live more safely, comfortably and remain independent.  But how can one afford this?  A reverse mortgage may be the solution beyond what Medicare or insurance will pay for.

A reverse mortgage is a special loan to allow seniors to remain in their home with security, independence, dignity, and control by converting the equity into cash.  Similar to a conventional loan where a lien is placed on the home yet the borrower retains ownership.  The reverse mortgage is different from a conventional loan with no income or credit scores required and no monthly mortgage payment requirements.

The reverse mortgage loan amount is based on the age of the borrower, their home value and an Expected Interest Rate.  Due and payable when the home is no longer the primary residence, usually when they move, die or sell, a reverse mortgage can allow one to remain in their home and use the equity now.  As a non-recourse loan there is no personal liability to the borrower or their estate as long as they are not retaining ownership.  If the home is sold for more than the loan balance then the borrower(s) or their heirs keep the difference.Reverse Mortgage Helped Bob Modify His Home

Bob, a Minnesota senior who had lost his wife wanted to stay in his home.  He did the reverse mortgage and with a portion of his proceeds he modified his home to be prepared for the future such as having the doorways wider to accommodate a wheel chair and grab bars installed.  He’s thrilled that he was able to have his home modified and will be able to remain there for years to come.

 
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Posted by on September 14, 2010 in Uncategorized

 

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